Comparing Bipolar 2 Disorder to Breast Cancer

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Comparing Bipolar 2 Disorder to breast cancer. Bipolar 2 Disorder (BP-2) is a new diagnostic category created by psychiatrists and made official in the 1994 DSM-4. DSM stands for ‘Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders’ and is what they use to match a patients symptoms with a diagnosis.

Comparing Bipolar 2 Disorder to Breast Cancer

It’s how they get paid by insurance companies to provide treatment and how they try to maintain some semblance of a scientific approach to treating mental illness i.e. using a classification system with corresponding recommended treatment protocols.

But it is far from an exact science. There is no blood test to tell you if you have bipolar disorder of whatever type. The new ‘BP-2’ diagnosis is supposedly a subset of actual Manic Depression where the person expereinces primarily depression (what these symtpoms have been classified as for ages) with some hypomania.

Previous post: Is Hypomania Always a Bad Thing?

How Does Bipolar 2 Disorder Compare to Breast Cancer?

I am comparing the diagnosis of Bipolar 2 Disorder to breast cancer to illustrate how it compares to actual Bipolar Disorder (Manic Depression, now called “Bipolar 1 Disorder”). By comparison, BP-2 is more like having a benign breast cyst than actual breast cancer – or actual bipolar illness.

I had two friends in college who suffered quite a bit of anxiety and emotional distress over small lumps in their breasts. For one it was related to an allergic condition for the other it was said to be genetic and she was advised to work on diet changes to keep the distressing fluid-filled sacs from growing larger.

One had a surgical biopsy done to make sure there were no cancerous cells, the other had oozing of pus from lesions in the surrounding area and used antibiotic creams, had treatment for allergies and even moved out of the city to an area with more sunshine and less air pollution to improve her health.

But did either of them run around saying they had breast cancer or require treatment for cancer? No. Did oncologists give them radiation and chemotherapy as a group of doctors got together and held a medical conference deciding there should be a new ‘breast cancer spectrum’ and more patients to give these toxic treatments to and make greater profits?

No. Why not?

Bipolar 2 Disorder is More Like Having Benign Breast Cysts than Breast Cancer

Compared to actually suffering the serious mental illness Manic Depression, someone who fits this new diagnostic category called BP-2 is analogous to someone with the physical condition of benign breast cysts compared to breast cancer. It is a different illness of a different nature and less serious.

And BP-2 should be reclassified as what it really is… severe depression with periods of instability or occassional heightened mood, a personality disorder or other.

The sufferer should get appropriate counseling and treatment for the depression that progressed to the point they sought out help, not the diagnosis of bipolar and pressure to take muliple toxic psychotropic medications.

Bipolar 2 Disorder is Not Bipolar

Bipolar 2 Disorder is not new, it is a form of depression that has been around as long as the medical condition of Manic Depression has. And just like BP-1 (Manic Depression) there can be varying degress of severity of symptoms.

BP-II depression can be syndromal and subsyndromal, and it is the prominent feature of BP-II. It is often a mixed depression, i.e. it has concurrent, usually subsyndromal, hypomanic symptoms. It is the depression that usually leads the patient to seek treatment.

Source: Bipolar II disorder : epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

To classify hypomania as an illness that needs to be treated is suspect in and of itself, though that is the key criteria to the Bipolar 2 Disorder diagnosis. And it created a whole new set of symptoms (depression with mood instability) that would be able to be profited from by psychiatry and psychologists.

Related post: Psychiatrists Who Speak Out About Psychiatry.

Congrats to them. They weren’t making enough money off the illness of depression and antidepressant drugs to treat depression that they created a whole new subset of the very serious medical condition BP-1 – that in itself is difficult to diagnose and treat – to prescribe more of the new class of antipsychotic drugs to.

Showing just how unscientific and unethical their field of medicine is; great job.

Related post: What is the Chemical Imbalance Theory?.

The whole new ‘bipolar spectrum’ trivializes the serious medical condition Manic Depression (BP-1), misclassifies forms of severe depression and weakens medical research and treatment options for both.

Let’s not touch upon the issues of poverty, incest, sexual assault, chemical imbalance due to food allergies or exposure to toxins and the myriad of other treatable conditions that should be focused on to avoid having to take psychotropic medications or at least prevent the health consequences of long-term use.

Not today for this article, maybe another day, another blog post.

Cheers, Molly

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2 Comments

  1. Anonymous said:

    Wow. How dare you. As someone suffering from BP-2 (a real condition, not one made up by the psychiatric profession you are so desperate to malign) I take deep offense at the incredibly dismissive tone of this “article” or blog entry or whatever you want to call it. So because BP-2 patients don’t struggle as much as you do we don’t count? We’re relegated back to “a facet of depression.” I was diagnosed with MDD in my mid-teens and primarily felt sad or unhappy for several years. As I grew older, I began to have (undiagnosed) hypomanic episodes. Frankly, I was surprised and a bit frightened at this change. Why did I feel more irritable than sad some days? Why did I feel so driven (almost to the point of desperation) to complete a goal? Have you not heard of (or bothered to research) hypomanic episodes or examine them without bias? Granted, it is a less extreme form of mania than those diagnosed with BP-1 but it is still a different experience than a depressive episode (and when it is extremely unfamiliar it’s hard to understand and scary). Two states of mind, two poles, thus a modified diagnosis and BP-2. Just because it’s different from yours doesn’t mean it doesn’t “count”. No medical profession is perfect and not all psychiatrists are good at what they do. I don’t know if you had a bad experience (or several) but lumping the whole profession together to attack it is unfair to doctors (such as mine) who do good work and probably saved my life. If you don’t trust or believe in antidepressants or psychotropic medication that’s your call but dismissing it entirely is in and of itself harmful. Your words may have an impact on someone who is suffering without entirely knowing why. What if, based on your opinion, they may choose not to seek treatment out of fear of the profession and medication you have demonized? Should they continue to be in pain because of your self-righteousness? You should be ashamed of yourself.

    December 18, 2016
    Reply
    • Molly said:

      Hi Anonymous and thank you for your thoughts – everyone’s matter, and the article was not directed at ‘people who suffer with severe mood issues’ – of any type, but about the overdiagnosing and MISUSE/OVERUSE of the term ‘bipolar’ to get more people on drugs.

      I never (or never would, you clearly have not read much of this blog or know me at all) that anyone ‘doesn’t count’ – and never said “BP-2 is a ‘facet of depression'”.

      I said it is a “Different illness of a different nature and less serious” – which is true. Major Depressive Disorder is not Manic Depression. And depression is a horrific illness, anyone should understand that and I’ve written a bunch about that. But colon cancer is not brain cancer. Benign breast cysts are not breast cancer. BP-2 is not Manic Depression.

      You can research the issue, I have and will speak out against it to prevent other from being used by Big Pharma doctors to make more money, and prevent others from not undertanding that their mood issues are not any identified chemical imbalance in their brain – that’s hogwash – and psych meds may help a severe illness state temporarily (I’ve had major doses administered at times, many years ago) but are toxic, brain damaging and often lead to permanent disability.

      Here’s an article that you might find interesing (does not talk about BP-2 or the issues above) : If Antidepressants Worked Better We Would Have Less Disability From Depression.

      I knew the above could offend some – but wrote it anyways. As someone who is Manic Depression, the number of folks who are getting diagnosed ‘bipolar’ (post 1990s) who do not have the illness (much of it from being given antidepressants that make them worse… then they get a BP-2 diagnosis, more meds and made sicker – is awful) is enraging to me.

      Nothing self-righteous – it’s enraging. The above was directed as the practitioners who are supporting this bs. And at the ‘bipolar advocates’ who are promoting misinformation.

      Bipolar 2 disorder is NOT Manic Depression. But they use the term ‘bipolar’ as if they have the same illness. They do not.

      If you have a diagnosis of BP-2 then hopefully you will find ways to be well. But for you – or anyone else – to say they are Manic Depressive… when they primarily experience depression and have NO CLUE to what someone like me – anyone with BP-1 – goes through is enraging.

      ‘Bipolar Disorder’ is now used as a term synonomously with the illness Manic Depression by many health practioners. And that is the comparison above – nothing personal to you or anyone given any BP label, though you can react that way to the info if you want. I will fight for better understanding of, treatment options for BP-1.

      You can write about and fight for whatever you please as well. Just be clear. The only ‘shame’ is licensed professionals diagnosing those with ‘bipolar’ who don’t have the illness.

      And in those who are not Manic Depressive giving the impression they are – using the term ‘bipolar’ so as to appear they have the same illness.

      December 20, 2016
      Reply

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