Are Your Psych Meds Making You Sick?

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Are your psych meds making you sick? Doctors treat bipolar disorder primarily by prescribing medications; sometimes many medications for the multitude of symptoms common to the illness. Too many at times and the medications all have side effects, some very serious ones.

Are Your Psych Meds Making You Sick?

I recently connected with mental illness survivor Andy Berhman via a mutual Facebook friend, He is the author of the book “Electroboy” – a memoir of living with the severe mania of bipolar illness.

Do You Really Need to Be Taking 5-7 Different Psychotropic Medications. Click To Tweet

Electroboy is the story of his life, as well as his experience of having multiple rounds of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) when he did not respond to psychotropic medications.

Related post: How Was the Chemical Imbalance Theory Developed?

Are Your Psych Meds Making You Sick?

I’m including Andy in this post though do not know him other than as a Facebook friend and have yet to read his book (on my list!) as his YouTube video he posted in 2009 about the dangers of the drug Abilify is making the rounds again.

Update August 20th: I have read the book and enjoyed it much, it is well written and interesting. My one criticism is that it is as much the story of someone with severe alcohol and drug addictions as it is of someone who suffers from Manic Depression… though the issue of addiction was white-washed throughout the book, giving an impression they are one and the same.

My thoughts: BP-1 and addiction are two separate illnesses. My understanding is someone like Andy who clearly displays both is given a dual diagnosis (addiction/bipolar). Not all who suffer from Manic Depression are addicts. Not all addicts are bipolar.

This is important as no one should ‘want’ the illness bipolar and many who are addicted to substances can get well with treatment (abstinence, support, counseling, etc.) and not need psychiatric care. Or to be put on harmful psychotropic meds unecessarily.

After suffering severe side effects of the medication Andy began speaking out against Abilify and against the pharmaceutical company Bristol-Meyers Squibb (BMS); the company who makes it and who he used to be a paid spokesman for. You can view the YouTube video here: Abilify Kills.

Are the Side Effects of Toxic Drugs Worth the Benefit?

Beyond the issue of being prescribed medications you do not need or that an unethical physician is recommending to treat side effects of some other med they’ve put you on is the simple question “are the side effects worse than the benefit”?

Is the medication making you better or worse? Maybe it was useful for a short-term problem but do you really need to stay on it for life? Do you know what the side effects are and the potential medical problems you may develop if you continue to take the drug?

You should. Do your research. Seek out alternative views other than the one you are getting from a Big Pharma puppet doctor who is failing to inform you of the risks or well meaning friends and relatives who really do not understand the potential severe side effects these medications can cause. If they did, they may not be so supportive of you taking them.

The Goal is to Become Well, Not Sicker

I firmly believe much of the disability associated with chronic, severe mental illness is a result of long-term use of psychotropic medications. For some persons it may be unavoidable, or they feel the side effects are worth suffering as they could not find ways to be well without taking them. I completely understand, I’ve lived that nightmare.

Hopefully we will find new and better alternative treatments for severe mental illness than toxic psychotropic medications. We want to get better just like any patient suffering from an illness wants to become well – not get sicker or more ill from brain-disabling treatments.

Be your own best advocate, learn about the risks associated with any psych meds your doctor is prescribing and make an educated, informed choice whether or not the med is something you want to be taking. Or at least whether the benefits it is giving you are worth the inherent risks to your health and well-being.

Then be ready to change your mind. Like Andy did. Maybe the medication was useful for a short or extended time to recover from a serious depressive episode or lower an elevated mood state so you did not have to be hospitalized.

But do you need to take psych meds forever? Do you know the harmful effects it may have on your mind, body and soul if you do?

Image is from ClipArtLord.com.

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12 Comments

  1. Reabel Reed said:

    I would like to help fight for change bcuz now they r starting on my grandson and daughter…Reba

    October 15, 2016
    Reply
    • Molly said:

      I am so sorry so long to reply – limited online time right now. I am sending you an email (check your spam folder if you don’t see it!) and we will for sure work together on an article. These stories are important to tell and share. It worries me you say ‘starting on’ above… not quite sure what you mean by that but it seems you feel powerless in some ways and you are not.

      Talk soon, Molly

      October 26, 2016
      Reply
  2. Reabel Reed said:

    They started victimizing me b4 I was born my bio mom was schizophrenic. They had her in the state hospital on meds and ECT while she was pregnant. Then they got hold of me when I was 23. First anxiety meds, then depression, then bipolar. Then they got hold of my son diagnosed with ADHD and bipolar. He is dead now. He was only 30.

    October 13, 2016
    Reply
    • Molly said:

      Thank you so much for sharing (what you write above is incredible personal and tragic) and speaking out. I am so sorry for your lineage of illness – when I was in nursing school and had a rotation in a locked ward I was shocked when they brought in a pregnant woman (completely strung out, so ill, it was so sad). Very hard things to witness much less have to live through or have a family member suffer from.

      I’m so frustrated with what has gone on the past 20 years or so. I guess a major turning point was the ‘bipolar spectrum’ when we focus on BP, the expansion of the illness to drug more folks… and I guess (second thought) that wasn’t really correct… it was 1980 that they started letting kids get labeled BP so they could drug them, the spectrum was added in 1994 to cover-up side effects from antidepressants that make people hyper, emotional labile, etc… they then got to claim these folks were BP-2.

      October 14, 2016
      Reply
    • Molly said:

      And those who are compliant with treatment (take the meds or are forced to take them, many eventually getting ECT when there brain-body cannot tolerate anymore of the brain diabling toxic chemicals), get sicker, etc. then become mental health advocates that recommend the same treatments for others.

      The kids thing is just unfathomable, can’t even go there but I will write about it. I am so sorry about your son. That’s just incredibly sad.

      October 14, 2016
      Reply
    • Molly said:

      If you ever want to share more, or even do a little interview (do not have to use your name) – if you think it would be healing/cathartic and maybe help others understand better some of these very difficult realities I would love to.

      Just a thought. This blog and my book has helped me to heal in some ways, but mainly has brought up a TON of anger over what’s been going on and the lies that are still being promoted i.e. “Chemical Imbalance”, etc.

      There’s no such thing. But every BP blogger out there that I’ve connected with (and other BP advocates, authors, survivors, etc.) still promote that and promote the medications as a necessity. They’re are not. Can help with a short-term crisis but long-term will worsen whatever created the crisis and lead to disability.

      I’m ranting now – just this stuff is very frustrating and I know you will understand. Contact me anytime, Molly

      October 14, 2016
      Reply
      • Reabel Reed said:

        OK. So how would we connect to do that? I go by “Reba”…Reabel Reed

        October 15, 2016
        Reply
    • Molly said:

      Sorr for such a long, disjointed reply but the WiFi I am at would not let me post all that in one reply. Hugs.

      October 14, 2016
      Reply
  3. Jay said:

    Been on mostly all of them. I am so sick from the meds, my meds aren’t working… been on them two decades, I’m done!

    August 27, 2016
    Reply
    • Molly said:

      I’m so sorry to hear that Jay and they made me worse in general so I did not stay on them. Many others share our experiences, but of course all the ‘advocates’ and most health providers keep claiming it is necessary, etc. It’s not. And then folks don’t seek other ways to be well, think of other health issues that may be causing some of their symptoms etc.

      The only thing I agree with is short-term use to stabilize someone who is psychotic (or severely suicidal, to prevent them taking their lives – even if a placebo effect in that case I’d want them to have some effect to stop them from taking their own lives).

      But the problem comes in after a brief response from the med helps (psychosis remits, person reports feeling “better”) they then get told that is what they need to take long-term, rest of their lives or whatever. And we know how that turns out… side effects start, they then get put on more meds, keep worsening, etc. until they get to the point where ECT is recommended.

      It’s a sick cycle – and the cycle isn’t the ill person, the cycle is the mental health community and professionals who refuse to educate themselves and treat their patients (or refer to other forms of care, medical providers) in ways to promote long-term health and wellness. All they want is to write a prescription. And they (most of them) could care less it seems about the ill effects those meds cause, that increases a person’s suffering. Sick treatment by a sick system.

      Let’s fight for change, refuse to be victimized. Hugs, Molly

      September 5, 2016
      Reply

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